Jacksonville, Alabama

Major Crimes Unit

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We keep all calls confidential. If you have information on “Drug Activity”, please call us at (256) 770-7350 or FAX (256) 770-7354 sent us a letter with as much detail as you have to: C.C.D.T.F., P.O. Box 2349, Anniston, AL. 36202.

History –

Calhoun County law enforcement agencies have always worked and conducted narcotics type operations in their respective jurisdictions. The problem with this type of operation is that the “Bad Guys” don’t just operate in one or two jurisdictions. These type people and this type of activity tends to move around and do business from city to city, county to county, and state to state. The drug trade is a world wide business and needs to be dealt with on a larger scale. Also the cost in surveillance / undercover equipment, running an under cover operation, man power and all the other time, equipment, and personnel needed to conduct any type of major investigations is exhausting to any one city budget.

In 1988, the District Attorney’s office, along with the other law enforcement agencies in Calhoun County came together and organized the “Calhoun County Drug Task Force”. Jacksonville Police Department was and still is an involved member and supporter of this organization. Calhoun County is the sixth largest county in the State of Alabama.

Coverage Area – 

Calhoun County has a population of approximately 130,000 and covers over 611 square miles. Anniston, the county seat, has a population of approximately 60,000 in the police jurisdiction alone. Cleburne County encompasses 561 square miles of primarily rural territory and has a population of approximately 14,000. That gives the Calhoun / Cleburne Major Crimes Unit an area of 1,172 square miles and over 144,000 people to patrol for narcotics and violent crime violations.

Assistance / Tip Information –

The Major Crimes Unit is always in need of your assistance and information to solve “Drug and Violent Crimes” in your area. The saying “It takes a village to raise a child” holds true in law enforcement. Without your assistance and information, that a drug dealer has moved into your neighborhood it is like a cancer to the community, bringing the wrong element around you and your family. Without you getting involved, the cancer spreads to a second residence, then a third.

Programs –

 

The Controlled Substances Act (CSA) places all substances which were in some manner regulated under existing federal law into one of five schedules. This placement is based upon the substance’s medical use, potential for abuse, and safety or dependence liability. The Act also provides a mechanism for substances to be controlled, or added to a schedule; decontrolled, or removed from control; and rescheduled or transferred from one schedule to another. The procedure for these actions is found in Section 201 of the Act (21 U.S.C. 811).

Schedule I

  • The drug or other substance has a high potential for abuse.
  • The drug or other substance has no currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States.
  • There is a lack of accepted safety for use of the drug or other substance under medical supervision.
  • Examples of Schedule I substances include heroin, lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), marijuana, and methaqualone.

Schedule II

  • The drug or other substance has a high potential for abuse.
  • The drug or other substance has a currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States or a currently accepted medical use with severe restrictions.
  • Abuse of the drug or other substance may lead to severe psychological or physical dependence.
  • Examples of Schedule II substances include morphine, phencyclidine (PCP), cocaine, methadone, and methamphetamine.

Schedule III

  • The drug or other substance has less potential for abuse than the drugs or other substances in schedules I and II.
  • The drug or other substance has a currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States.
  • Abuse of the drug or other substance may lead to moderate or low physical dependence or high psychological dependence.
  • Anabolic steroids, codeine and hydrocodone with aspirin or Tylenol®, and some barbiturates are examples of Schedule III substances.

Schedule IV

  • The drug or other substance has a low potential for abuse relative to the drugs or other substances in Schedule III.
  • The drug or other substance has a currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States.
  • Abuse of the drug or other substance may lead to limited physical dependence or psychological dependence relative to the drugs or other substances in Schedule III.
  • Examples of drugs included in schedule IV are Darvon®, Talwin®, Equanil®, Valium®, and Xanax®.

Schedule V

  • The drug or other substance has a low potential for abuse relative to the drugs or other substances in Schedule IV.
  • The drug or other substance has a currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States.
  • Abuse of the drug or other substances may lead to limited physical dependence or psychological dependence relative to the drugs or other substances in Schedule IV.
  • Cough medicines with codeine are examples of Schedule V drugs.

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